Elevator Frames

Some homes in coastal areas are raised to protect the home from possible flooding and storm surges. Elevators are commonplace in these homes for ease of transporting items up into the living space. A swinging door unit is installed into the rough opening in front of the elevator shaft for safety. This door swings into the living space or hallway.

Recently there was a code change involving these doors. ASME A17.1 Part 5.3 for Private Residence ensures there is not a space where a small child or pet could stand or become entrapped between the closed landing door and the elevator gate. The maximum distance permitted between the backside of the closed door at the elevator landing and the edge of the threshold at that floor landing is 3/4″. The maximum distance permitted between the backside of the closed door at the elevator landing and the elevator car gate is 4″.

To meet this code the door jambs can only be 2-1/4” in depth – a 1-3/4” door + 3/4” gap = 2-1/4” jamb depth. A typical jamb will need to be ripped back a larger frame to create this size. The smaller frame will sit back in the opening so an extension is needed on living side from edge of jamb to edge of drywall.

4-9/16″ Jamb / Old Code

2-1/4″ Jamb / New Code

In addition, these doors require additional field prep for a 2.5” x 8” box in which the locking mechanism sits. When the elevator is there, the door is unlocked, but when the elevator is not there, the door is locked. A traditional doorknob is not possible on the elevator side as it will not fit between the edge of the door and the elevator gate. A field applied ring pull with a profile less than 3/4” on the elevator side is possible. On the living side a dummy knob can be applied to the door face.

Reeb can craft a door frame with Primed, Pine, or Poplar frames only. At this time there are no rated frame options. A single rabbeted jamb will be ripped back to 2-1/4” in width for doors that are 3/0 or 3/6 in width and have a height of 6/8, 7/0, or 8/0. These doors will be a 1-3/4” interior door that is a solid core flush or molded or select stile and rail doors. No French, Sash, Exterior, or Hollow Core doors will be allowed to be configured.

Reeb’s shop will prep for hinges, a catch if desired, and will pre-hang the door unit. The shop will not prep for a bore or any other necessary prep. This work will need to be completed in the field. The door units will use a 4” ball bearing hinges in either radius and square. A catch, whether it be a standard magnetic, concealed magnetic, or roller, can be installed on the top or edge of the door. The unit will not have the possibility of a sill, brickmould, casing, or any additional hardware.

Many states have yet to adopt the new Safety Code so be sure to check all codes in your area for confirmation.

Victorian Home Styles

Queen Anne | Romanesque | Gothic Revival

Marked by asymmetry and textured exteriors, Victorian homes reflect the style of this grand period with elaborate detail. You likely have a Victorian if you have an edged roof, ornate gables or one or more wide porches with spindlework.

  • Reflects the style of this grand period with elaborate detail.
  • Marked by its asymmetry and textured exteriors.
  • Common Victorian Style Elements:
    • Towers and Turrets
    • Steep, Multi-Faceted Rooflines
    • Bay Windows and Porches
    • Ornate Trim

Classic Craft Fir
CCA1166

Classic Craft Mahogany
CCM303RXC

Classic Craft Mahogany
CCR10022

Classic Craft Canvas
CCV05023

Smooth-Star
S155

Smooth-Star
S994

Fiber-Classic Oak
FC31

Smooth-Star
S755


Home Styles

No matter the style of your home, there is a door that matches the architectural style. Not only does this help your design flow throughout the home, but it can help create a lasting first impression.


Colonial

This style, known for its refined design and symmetry, preserves the classic style of homes from America’s history. Colonial homes usually have two or three stories, fireplaces and brick or wood facades.

Click here to learn more about Colonial Style Homes.


Victorian

Marked by asymmetry and textured exteriors, Victorian homes reflect the style of this grand period with elaborate detail. You likely have a Victorian if you have an edged roof, ornate gables or one or more wide porches with spindlework.

Click here to learn more about Victorian Style Homes.


European

Inspired by the provincial style of countryside estates, European-style homes feature rich details with steep roofs and subtly flared curves at the eaves. Homes of this style are often faced with stucco or stone.

Click here to learn more about European Style Homes.


Craftsman

Showcasing the craft of building by hand, these homes emphasize the use of natural wood, stone and brick materials. Low pitched roof lines, tapered square columns and exposed rafters are typical of these “Arts and Crafts” beauties.

Click here to learn more about Craftsman Style Homes.


Southwest

With breezy spaces practical for warm climates, Southwest homes embody the exotic aesthetics of adobe homes. Look for stucco exteriors, stone accents and tile roofs to buffer the sun and heat.

Click here to learn more about Southwest Style Homes.


Coastal

Coastal homes mix traditional details and clean lines for casual elegance. This style is about blending indoor and outdoor living with great views, and may be identified by ample windows or an abundance of porches that invite ocean breezes.

Click here to learn more about Coastal Style Homes.


Traditional

Combining practicality with classic looks in almost any form, Traditional homes borrow elements from a variety of styles, without being easily classified as any particular one. If it looks like a straightforward family home and doesn’t fall into any categories above, it’s probably traditional.

Click here to learn more about Traditional Style Homes.


Modern

Modern-style homes fuse industrial concrete, vinyl and glass materials to create a stunning effect. Look for strong right angles, minimal box-like designs and asymmetrical exteriors.

Click here to learn more about Modern Style Homes.


Traditional Home Styles

New American | Farmhouse | Hill Country

Combining practicality with classic looks in almost any form, Traditional homes borrow elements from a variety of styles, without being easily classified as any particular one. If it looks like a straightforward family home and doesn’t fall into any categories above, it’s probably traditional.

  • Combines practicality with classic looks in almost any form.
  • Represents elements from a variety of styles.
  • Common Traditional Style Elements:
    • Steep-Pitched Rooflines
    • Multi-Pane Windows
    • Modest Porches
    • Simple Columns

Classic Craft Mahogany
CCM209

Classic Craft Mahogany
CCM204

Fiber-Classic Oak
FC164

Smooth-Star
S916

Classic Craft Fir
CCA1166

Smooth-Star
S2104

Smooth-Star
S2103

Smooth-Star
S120


Coastal Home Styles

Low Country | Cottage | Key West

Coastal homes mix traditional details and clean lines for casual elegance. This style is all about blending indoor and outdoor living with great views, and may be identified by their ample windows or an abundance of porches that invite ocean breezes.

  • Mixes traditional details and clean lines for casual elegance.
  • Blends indoor and outdoor living with great views.
  • Common Coastal Style Elements:
    • Multi-Peaked, Gabled Roofs
    • Impressive Windows
    • Many Patio Doors
    • Entry with Columns

Classic Craft Canvas
CCV9925

Classic Craft Canvas
CCV1418

Classic Craft Fir
CCA2730XE

Fiber-Classic Mahogany
FCM905

Smooth-Star
S2104XC

Smooth-Star
S5700

Smooth-Star
S5425

Smooth-Star
S1350


Modern Home Styles

Shed | Mid-Century | Contemporary

Modern-style homes fuse industrial concrete, vinyl and glass materials to create a stunning effect. Look for strong right angles, minimal box-like designs and asymmetrical exteriors.

  • Focuses on clean lines and asymmetrical exteriors.
  • Fuses together industrial concrete, vinyl and glass materials.
  • Common Modern Style Elements:
    • Flat or Shed Rooflines
    • Geometric or Angular Shapes
    • Expansive Windows
    • Minimal Decoration

Classic Craft Fir
CCA2310XG

Classic Craft Canvas
CCV1851

Fiber-Classic Oak
FC685LXK

Fiber-Classic Mahogany
FCM1652

Classic Craft Walnut
CCW903

Fiber-Classic Oak
FC4XN

Fiber-Classic Mahogany
FCM1LXK

Smooth-Star
S2XK


Southwest Home Styles

Mediterranean | Spanish Colonial | Mission

With breezy spaces practical for warm climates, Southwest homes embody the exotic aesthetics of adobe homes. Look for stucco exteriors, stone accents and tile roofs to buffer the sun and heat.

  • Includes breezy spaces practical for warm climates.
  • Feels exotic with stucco exteriors and stone accents.
  • Common Southwest Style Elements:
    • Low-Pitched Rooflines
    • Terracotta Roof Tiles
    • Arch Motifs and Mahogany Grain Details
    • Taller, Wider Doors

Classic Craft Mahogany
CCR30027

Classic Craft Canvas
CCV1519

Classic Craft Canvas
CCV1415

Fiber-Classic Mahogany
FCM574

Smooth-Star
S6051

Classic Craft Mahogany
CCR200

Classic Craft Mahogany
CCM701

Fiber-Classic Mahogany
FCM220


Colonial Home Styles

Georgian | Dutch Colonial | Federal

This style, known for its refined design and symmetry, preserves the classic style of homes from America’s history. Colonial homes usually have two or three stories, fireplaces and brick or wood facades.

  • Preserves the classic style of homes from America’s history.
  • Known for its refined design and symmetry.
  • Common Colonial Style Elements:
    • Attic Dormers
    • Multi-Pane Windows
    • Balanced Windows and Shutters
    • Entry with Columns

Classic Craft Oak
CC107

Classic Craft Mahogany
CC203

Fiber-Classic Oak
FC770

Smooth-Star
S262

Fiber-Classic Mahogany
FCM912

Classic Craft Oak
CC60

Smooth-Star
S2250

Smooth-Star
S255


European Home Styles

Tudor | French Country | Tuscan Villa

Inspired by the provincial style of countryside estates, European-style homes feature rich details with steep roofs and subtly flared curves at the eaves. Homes of this style are often faced with stucco or stone.

  • Inspired by the provincial style of countryside estates.
  • Features rich details on brick, stone and stucco exteriors.
  • Common European Style Elements:
    • Multi-Peaked Rooflines
    • Shingles or Clay Roof Tiles
    • Romantic Decoration
    • Arched Windows and Entryways

Classic Craft Mahogany
CCR1528

Classic Craft Mahogany
CCM306CAL

Classic Craft Mahogany
CCM302R

Fiber-Classic Oak
FC529

Classic Craft Mahogany
CCR200

Classic Craft Mahogany
CCR100

Smooth-Star
S2104

Smooth-Star
S200


Craftsman Home Styles

Prairie | Bungalow | Four Square

Showcasing the craft of building by hand, these homes emphasize the use of natural wood, stone and brick materials. Low pitched roof lines, tapered square columns and exposed rafters are typical of these “Arts and Crafts” beauties.

  • Exemplifies the craft of building by hand.
  • Emphasized by the use of natural wood, stone and brick materials.
  • Common Craftsman Style Elements:
    • Low-Pitched, Gabled Roofs
    • Decorative Brackets
    • Wide Front Porches
    • Tapered or Square Columns

Classic Craft Mahogany
CCR9925

Classic Craft Fir
CCA2350

Classic Craft Fir
CCA260

Classic Craft Canvas
CCV911

Fiber-Classic Mahogany
FCM4814XJ

Smooth-Star
S2650

Smooth-Star
S4816

Smooth-Star
S2103